Main Picture

I’m going to be completely honest with you. This review is going to be shorter, and less emotional then my projects in the past. This is primarily due to two reasons. The first being that the current title is divided into separate parts and  I only have access to the first. Secondly, Nicolas Eymerich The Inquisitor is a point and click adventure, and although I hoped my feelings would change, I really really dislike point and click adventures. It may be a little strange that I decided to review one, but it had been a while since i’d attempted to play and I hoped it would change my mind. Sadly, I was wrong. However, I will still do my best to provide a quality review. Now to the game…

Nicolas Eymerich provides a different kind of point and click adventure. Although not changing the core experience of the game, this title puts most of its power into the setting and the characters throughout the story. Unfortunately this has little effect. As for development, Nicolas Eymerich was created by MICROIDS, a small indie company located in France. They have developed a number of title since 2010, there most notable accomplishment being the acquiring of the popular Syberia series. Their most recent title, before the Inquisitor, was the release of the 5th game in their Dracula series in 2013. It accomplished a dark tone, while providing fans with a great point and click adventure. What fans really want to know, however, is if they were able to do the same with their newest game. In my opinion, kind of, but more of that after we dive into the story.

Story

Story

Starting abruptly, the Inquisitor begins with our hero, Nicolas Eymerich, waiting outside the office of the Local Abbot (A regional leader of the Catholic Church). After brushing aside a questionable guard, Nicolas enters the office and a heated conversation begins between the two men. Within this conversation it is revealed that Nicolas is a popular inquisitor and that the abbot has lost contact with one of his agents and the city he was working in. The Abbot continues to explain that the city may have an evil present within, a plague.  Sensing that something is off Nicolas confronts the Abbot about the questionable guards and the corruption in his rule that may have lead to the disappearance of his workers. Refusing to budge the abbot dismisses the Inquisitor and sends him to investigate the case. This is where Nicolas finds his mission, not so much to save the lost city and more so to figure out what the abbot is really doing. Knowing that he will eventually have to leave, Nicolas quickly must search through the church grounds, find the hints of corruption, and investigate the evil that is finding its way into “holy” men. This story is actually pretty interesting and as clues are found throughout the church grounds, the plot gets deeper, however much of the interesting story is killed by bad characters. All of the NPC characters are bland, boring, and badly acted. Not only is what they have to say uninteresting, but it is painful to listen too. Luckily,all of this goes away when you change the language from English to Latin. Yes, Latin! A key feature to the title, Latin dialogue makes the story sound authentic and beautiful. What they are saying remains dull, but it sound great.  Thats not the end of the story issues though. Nicolas, our hero, is truly unlikable and grouchy who treats people like crap, constantly complains, and is as stubborn as a rock. He literally has zero redeeming qualities, and is obnoxious to listen too, in English that is.

Gameplay

Gameplay

 It plays just as any other point and click adventure throughout the gaming world. Items are collected and used, and puzzles are solved to find new information. As stated before all the secrets found are aimed at taking down the abbot and eventually going out to the plagued city. There really isn’t anything special regarding the format of the gameplay, but there are a few little things that make it different. For example the items that are required for puzzles are occasionally very difficult to find, which can be a good thing or a bad thing depending on the gamer. Also, the puzzle are fairly entertaining. My favorite was among the first, where Nicolas had to put crystal into a statue in the correct order. The one issue with the puzzles is that there are no explanation on why you are doing them. At some point you just kind of realize that you have to if you want to find more information. Honestly, I wish i could say more, but it plays just as any other point and click would expect with less direction.

Presentation

Presentation

Unlike many point and click adventures, The Inquisitor tries something new and aims to balance 2D stationary object with the 3D rendered people. This would be extremely effect if this title didn’t looked dated in all aspects. The character models are poorly rendered and rather than a fluid movement, everything seems clunky and awkward. In addition, the exaggerated facial expressions points out the faults in the design and makes the game feel cheesy. Hands down the worst aspect of the presentation is the “painted-on” clothing, which bends and stretches with each model as they awkwardly limp across the room. I cringed when I saw the cross necklaces shrink and grow as the characters moved around. I will, however, commend the excellent job done on the scenery, which was detailed and truly beautiful. As for music, nothing really stood out to me, and many of the actions end with repeated clunks and bonks. Overall, dated graphics with forgettable music.

Again, I’m not a massive fan of point and click, but even I could tell there were some flaws in the game. Vague ques, dated graphics, and a forgettable feeling are just a few of the weights that are dragging this title down. What was supposed to be a dark adventure filled with corruption and demons, turned out to be a misguided tale with a dated feel.

If for some reason you are interested in seeing this title for yourself, check it out here on steam.

2.5/5

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